Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 70-76
The Protection and Activation of Shanxi Jinzhong Historical and Cultural City from the Perspective of Humanity
Gao Jie, Faculty of Architecture and City Planning, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, China
Zhai Hongyu, Faculty of Architecture and City Planning, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, China
Received: Jun. 1, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 28, 2020;       Published: Jul. 13, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.urp.20200502.15      View  201      Downloads  90
Abstract
China has a large number of traditional dwellings and a wide range, which truly reflects the production and living conditions, religious beliefs and aesthetic concepts of local residents at that time. It can be said that dwelling are living fossils for studying anthropology and architectural history. However, with the rapid development of the economic situation, the protection of traditional dwellings has also been strongly impacted. The protection and activation of the traditional dwellings will become the focus of attention in the future. This paper explores the methods and purposes of the protection and activation of traditional dwellings through an investigation of the ancient city of Pingyao in Jinzhong, with a dynamic and static combination, multicultural coexistence of academic vision. Through the dual exploration of the material cultural heritage and the intangible cultural heritage, we can inherit the characteristics of the traditional folk houses and use the strategy of the traditional block layout for reference, so that the historical cultural heritage which can not be copied and rebuilt can be preserved. It is also the primary goal of contemporary architectural history workers.
Keywords
Traditional Dwellings, The Ancient City of Pingyao, Protection, Activation, Multicultural
To cite this article
Gao Jie, Zhai Hongyu, The Protection and Activation of Shanxi Jinzhong Historical and Cultural City from the Perspective of Humanity, Urban and Regional Planning. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 70-76. doi: 10.11648/j.urp.20200502.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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